The 2.0 Adoption Council Internal Evangelist of the Year 2010

Last week, I announced The 2.0 Adoption Council’s Internal Evangelist of the Year for 2010 at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Santa Clara.

Below is the text of the speech along with the award winner announcement. . . .

The 2.0 Adoption Council Internal Evangelist of the Year Award Keynote

I’m here to announce this year’s Internal Evangelist of the Year Award. Before I do that, let me share a few words about The 2.0 Adoption Council.

About the Council

In the Summer of 2009 after the June Enterprise 2.0 Conference Susan Scrupski and a few conference attendees were reflecting over dinner conversation how very few practitioner cases studies there were at that conference.

Hoping to change that, Susan formed the council to bring practitioners together to connect, share, network and advance the industry’s collective knowledge in this space around what it takes to build a business case, drive acceptance, drive adoption and drive a deployment program.

Membership

Today there are around 100 active members, all leading enterprise 2.0 programs within their organizations. While we may all use different platforms and tools, we all share a common desire to transform the way in which our organizations work and the way in which our workers get work done.

Benefits of The 2.0 Adoption Council Membership

While I am further along in my own journey than perhaps new members might be, every day I still learn from a fantastic community of professionals, people who are leading very aggressive programs in their organizations.

When I have questions, need to add new parts to our program, or figure out how to tackle an issue or benchmark best practices, I know I have ready access to a community of smart professionals to help guide me. I’ve also ensured to share my knowledge with other members as well. Bottom line, membership has been both job enriching and career enhancing.

Internal Evangelist of the Year Award 2010

I’m here to give an award, right? So what is this award about?

This IEoY Award recognizes an individual for his or her accomplishments in advancing their organization’s enterprise 2.0 goals. This award recognizes the evangelist who is:

  • Passionate
  • Inspirational
  • Enthusiastic
  • An expert in business strategy
  • Politically savvy
  • A catalyst for change
  • A leader and team player
  • And someone who has great capacity to move and motivate an entire organization

The nominees on the list this year received overwhelming endorsement from executives and colleagues within their companies as the candidates who represent all the qualities I described.

As the winner of this inaugural award last year, I’m honored to pass the torch to a new IEoY this year. I know each and every nominee very well, and I’m glad I didn’t have to make the final decision. It would have been a tough choice. Every nominee has led impressive programs in their organizations. AND they have given back to the industry, sharing their knowledge, speaking at industry events or blogging their lessons learned.

I’m thrilled to see these names on the list and I’m honored to call every one of these nominees my friend.

Good luck to all of you.

So who are the nominees this year?

  • Bruce Galinsky, Metlife
  • Kevin Crossman, Juniper Networks
  • Greg Lowe , Alcatel-Lucent
  • Megan Murray, Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Rawn Shah. IBM
  • Luis Suarez IBM

The Envelope Please . . .

And now, it gives me great honor to announce the 2010 Internal Evangelist of the Year…may I have the envelope please.

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Join me in congratulating . . . Luis Suarez

It’s with great pleasure that I announce Luis Suarez from IBM as this year’s IE0Y Award Winner.

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Some photo credit under CC to Alex Dunne http://www.flickr.com/photos/adunne/with/5165270572/

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Community Managers. Why Do You Need Them? And What Do They Do?

That is the topic of a paper I submitted for the Enterprise 2.0 Conference commencing next week in Santa Clara.

Why did I pick this topic?

Well as many of you know, CSC started our journey in social collaboration for an internal facing, or employee community. But what many of you may not know as much about is the equivalent progress we’ve made with external facing communities that fall under an umbrella of a wider Social CRM strategy. Our community program is one tactic in a series of strategies aimed at connecting various points of our eco-system together in a well-crafted way to fuel innovation for our enterprise and our customers.

I’ve been fortunate to get involved with this effort and really understand what it takes to stand up, plan for and launch communities for both employees and customers. And to me, it became immediately clear that while both types of communities require good community leadership – the tactics and specifics can vary ever so slightly or in some cases, maybe more dramatically.

This conference will be my fifth Enterprise 2.0 Conference, and I had a strong desire to help the conference evolve with topics I know practitioners need and want. For at least the last few conferences the topic of “community management” was often alluded to in other tracks, but never covered as a full, dedicated session. And yet there are so many aspects of good community management that should be talked about, shared and compared.

Research suggests the strong correlation between successful communities and the quality of community management found in those communities. Community Managers are the coaches, so to speak, of their communities. Their passion, vision and enthusiasm can inspire members and set the tone for the level of engagement within your community. But what does that mean exactly? How can you make the case for a community manager? What do they do? Why are they critical to a community?

These were all good questions I thought new practitioners would need answers to in order to make a solid business case for this role. It was with that in mind that I submitted my paper, but I didn’t just want to share the CSC Case Study even though we’ve had experience now with both employee and customer communities. Instead,  I thought it would be more informative to put together a session with smart community managers from other companies – a true mini-case study session.

Here’s the abstract for our session:

You hear you need a Community Manager. But why do you need one? And what should a Community Manager do?

Whether you’re launching an employee or market-facing community, you’ll want to join this session to learn why this role is so critical to the success of your community. Speakers from three organizations will share community governance models, community manager job descriptions, and provide a glimpse into the day-in-the-life of a community manager.

Fortunately, I found two other great practitioners to round out this session. Speakers will include:

External, Customer Community Management

Erica Kuhl
Community Manager
Salesforce.com | Social Media & Community
Blog: blogs.salesforce.com
Twitter: @erica_kuhl

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Internal, Employee Community Management

Megan Murray
Community Manager, Project Manager
Booz Allen Hamilton
Blog: http://meganmurray.net
Twitter: @MeganMurray
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External (Customer), Internal (Employee) Perspective Compared

Claire Flanagan
Director, KM and Social Business Collaboration Strategy
CSC
Blog: https://cflanagan.wordpress.com
Twitter: @cflanagan
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Attending Enterprise 2.0 in Santa Clara?

Be sure to check out our session on Tuesday, November 9, 2010. And note, this time, we are only one session of an inaugural community management track at the conference. Check it out! http://www.e2conf.com/santaclara/conference/community-development-and-management.php

Jive Champion Award Recipient At JiveWorld10

Last week, Jive announced customer awards along several key categories. I am honored to received the Jive Champion Award at this year’s  JiveWorld10, held September 14-16 at the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco. 

This honor, I believe, recognizes not only my successful efforts in delivering a global, enterprise wide program and strategy for employees, and now for customers, but more importantly recognizes the impact I have made in communicating the value of Jive as a vendor and social business software in general externally to the market.

I have been fortunate to speak at many events in the last few years and have met many customers or prospects at varying stages of their journey. I get inspired when I see others share the energy and passion we all have in this space. We all realize for the first time we see the promise of decades worth of requirements only now starting to be delivered in these newer tools.

It is easy to be a Jive champion in a space that makes work fun. Yes, there have been many late nights (see my Work Life Balance: Does it Exist post), and CSC’s own journey has been exactly that – a journey. But it’s one that has delivered business results while inspiring workers to get energized about their job. And it’s one that has afforded me the opportunity to share and compare stories with many other colleagues of mine in the industry.

Are you ready to get going on your journey?

This is a great moment in our industry. As Jive likes to say, it’s the biggest “from” > “to” moment in our work and in our generation. A time where we can revolutionize the way work gets done.

Are you ready to join the social business revolution?  I urge you to download Jive’s Social Business Imperatives. A must read for anyone planning either a move in an employee community, customer community or social media engagement. Even if you don’t select Jive, that document is a good read to help you with ammunition you need to make your business case (though I believe if you do the evaluation Jive will be hard to beat).

Why I’m looking forward to JiveWorld 2010

As a Jive customer, I am so energized to attend this year’s JiveWorld. Again.

Why? Let me explain:

  1. Jive does conferences “right”.  I have been to several industry conferences (even one overseas) and I can tell you the best ones I attend are when customers share their stories. Yes, in this industry you do need to hear from experts from time to time. But the best value I’ve ever gotten is hearing from practitioners trying to execute programs I have an interest in and hearing them describe their goals, their challenges, their successes and their lessons learned. At JiveWorld, you get all that. Jive does a great job balancing Jive content (roadmap, keynote sessions) with real customer stories. No matter where you are on your deployment journey, you will find “a track for that” and a customer to learn from.
  2. Jive listens. Last year I think a number of us told them something like “awesome content, how the heck did you fit that in one day and a half?” So, this year, did you see the schedule? More customers, more tracks and two full days. Trust me, if you attend this year, guaranteed no matter what session or track you chose,  you will be missing valuable content going on in the other tracks. There is just no way to clone yourself to attend them all. But that’s ok, because Jive will make sure you have access to the videos and presentations after the conference concludes. So you can finish “attending” the conference when you go back home.
  3. Jive knows how to throw a party. Many of us got our professional avatars photographed at JiveWorld last year by the Jive-sponsored photographer. I have great memorable photos with my industry and Jive friends taken from Jive’s photo both (Jive that’s a hint: don’t get rid of the photo booth this year!). I still have fond memories of the goodies that were given out during the party. Heck, there were so many good things about the party I can’t really list them all. It still comes down to one thing, though. Jive knows how to put on a good event.
  4. JiveWorld provides fantastic networking opportunities. I re-acquainted myself with friends or made new ones. Jive was a tremendous help to many of us customers and prospects who wanted to line up “birds of a feather” sessions. Again, Jive listened and learned from last year, and I hear they have even better plans for facilitating customer and prospecting networking opportunities.
  5. And finally, Jive hires top talent who are passionate and energized. Let’s face it; it’s just darned too much fun to be around fun people!

If you are on the fence, I urge you to sign up. JiveWorld did sell out last year. And it will again this year.

There is a reason why Jive is the leader in three Gartner Magic Quadrants. Don’t you want to find out why? (Hint: Register Now!)


Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams (A CSC Case Study)

I always enjoy attending the Enterprise 2.0 conference, and last week’s conference in Boston was no different. Simon Scullion and I shared CSC’s case study story during our session titled “Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams”.

Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams

The 1989 baseball film “Field of Dreams” is often cited as the source for the memorable quote “If you build it, they will come.” In the film, an Iowa farmer hears a voice to tell him to build a baseball field and the ghosts of Shoeless Joe Jackson and other Chicago White Sox players will just show up and play. No business plan. No marketing plan. No plan at all in fact. Just the notion that if you build the ball park your players and your audience will just show up.

But we know that’s not the way business works. You can’t just install something without a business and marketing plan. In a business context, this is often used as a negative metaphor – people say “Don’t build it, and just hope they will come.”

Enterprise 2.0 is not a field of dreams. You need to plan to be successful. More importantly these tools are about people. You really need to understand how to engage your audience.

But how do you locate, find, inspire, motivate and orchestrate passionate advocates to help you engage your users? Well, CSC feels we had the winning combination to go wide, go global and go viral. Our case study talk during the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston last week described what CSC did to fill the seats at our baseball stadium of collaboration.

Adoption Planning: Plan for the People

So how did we do it? And — how is any of that different from any other large IT project? Well, most of us know how to roll out tools, get the system set up, configured and deployed. And we felt that we had done everything we could to prepare for a successful IT deployment. But we realized early on this could not be just another an IT project.

This was a tool for people. We knew we would ask users to evolve how they think about the nature of their work and the transparency with which they do that work.

You hear in the industry you can’t plan to go viral. I argue you can’t viral if you don’t plan well – – Claire Flanagan

So to view the highlights of our story, view our presentation now on SlideShare:

Below is a very brief summary of our adoption planning tactics:

  1. Adoption Principles – Before we started we thought carefully about our adoption guiding principles, those areas that would shape how we would approach deployment. There are no right answers, no silver bullet, in fact the answers to any of these areas can vary for your organization and your culture. We addressed areas like executive involvement, listening and adapting to our politics and culture, thinking about taxonomy patterns and emergence, staffing for success (community managers and advocates) and other important areas.
  2. Advocate Planning – We knew we needed to both quickly scale the efforts of our small project team, but also knew that we needed to reach out to our global users to help us go wide, global and viral. We located a team of 12 chief champions who helped us bring on another 100 advocates prior to our launch.
  3. Executives as Advocates – We knew our executives were not only sponsors of our program, but they were also critical in “walking the talk” and showing that C3 was safe for business. Our advocates helped us engage executives as well as they worked with local management.
  4. Seed Use Cases – No one likes joining a space that is empty. They don’t know what to do or where to start. Also, these tools have to be more than just “Facebook for the Enterprise”. Your executives demand it. We felt it was important to seed use cases that met our business goals, use cases that our global project, competency or community teams could start using right away. Our advocates helped us seed over 200 groups prior to our C3 pilot launch.
  5. Watercooler – Don’t overlook the importance of relationships and the value of a ‘virtual’ watercooler – a location where pure “social” conversations are ok. We knew we needed to trust our employees, but we needed to also create ‘bump in’ opportunities where new relationships and trust could form.
  6. Feedback & Transparency – We knew it was important to provide formal feedback mechanisms while practicing transparency. With the help of our advocates we engaged in both the easy and the tough conversations online – and we feel – earned the trust of our employees along the way.

The above are obviously only small summary points of our talk.

To hear the more specific tactics we used in our Adoption Planning, catch one of our upcoming talks at one of the many industry conferences coming up. Watch our blogs for where you’ll hear our case study next.

Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams- A CSC Case Study

For several months, CSC’s Case Study has gotten some industry attention for an Enterprise 2.0 program pilot that was so successful it acted as the final stage in making the business case for an ongoing production deployment.

Be sure to sign up for the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston this June to hear both CSC’s executive keynote and a detailed breakout session.

CSC’s Executive Business Sponsor Keynotes June’s Enterprise 2.0 Conference

Lem LasherCSC’s executive business sponsor, Lem Lasher, President of Global Business Solutions (GBS) and CSC’s Chief Innovation Officer, will be a featured keynote at this year’s conference. He will talk about “The C-Level Perspective: Social Collaboration Fueling Innovation, Business Results and Competitive Advantage”

Session Abstract:

“CSC has had remarkable success with social business software through a strategic, award-winning initiative called C3 to “connect people to people, connect people to content, and connect people to communities.” This global social collaboration platform enjoyed early success during its pilot phase collapsing time zones, distance and organizational barriers, reducing business development time and driving revenue and innovation.

Join this keynote to hear CSC’s C3 executive business sponsor Lem Lasher give insight on why he chose to sponsor this program and how it aligned with CSC’s broader strategic collaboration and innovation initiatives required for fueling the company’s growth and competitive strategy. Finally, Lem will share his thoughts on successfully engaging executive sponsors and how to tailor your business case to the C-level.”

“Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams – A CSC Case Study”

CSC knew that success with an Enterprise 2.0 program required more than just deploying a tool, we knew it required planning for the people, planning a solid adoption program. Come hear CSC’s case study, presented by Simon Scullion and Claire Flanagan at the conference on Tuesday, June 15, 2010, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Session abstract:

“You’ve secured sponsorship for your E2.0 initiative. Now what? You know you need top management involvement to establish “formal” support. You’ve also heard you need groundswell support, too. But how do you get both? And what’s the right mix of each to foster success? And how do you ensure that when you build the environment, your users will come?

Come learn how CSC got beyond the Field of Dreams with a robust adoption campaign for “C3: Connect. Communicate. Collaborate.”, its global internal social business software initiative that collapsed time zone, distance and organizational barriers.  We’ll discuss our multi-tiered advocacy strategy that augmented our formal, global communication plan and provided the bottoms-up support that was fundamental to the viral, early adoption success of this industry-recognized global initiative.”

Be sure to register, if you haven’t already. I hope to see you there.

Come see why The 2.0 Adoption Council rocks

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Check out why The 2.0 Adoption Council Rocks.

Want more information on why I’m a charter member? We are a network of passionate champions in our respective enterprises, sharing our knowledge with others on their journey for enterprise 2.0 adoption. Learn more, check out my earlier blog post about the group, or just join us – click on the logo below!

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