Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams (A CSC Case Study)

I always enjoy attending the Enterprise 2.0 conference, and last week’s conference in Boston was no different. Simon Scullion and I shared CSC’s case study story during our session titled “Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams”.

Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams

The 1989 baseball film “Field of Dreams” is often cited as the source for the memorable quote “If you build it, they will come.” In the film, an Iowa farmer hears a voice to tell him to build a baseball field and the ghosts of Shoeless Joe Jackson and other Chicago White Sox players will just show up and play. No business plan. No marketing plan. No plan at all in fact. Just the notion that if you build the ball park your players and your audience will just show up.

But we know that’s not the way business works. You can’t just install something without a business and marketing plan. In a business context, this is often used as a negative metaphor – people say “Don’t build it, and just hope they will come.”

Enterprise 2.0 is not a field of dreams. You need to plan to be successful. More importantly these tools are about people. You really need to understand how to engage your audience.

But how do you locate, find, inspire, motivate and orchestrate passionate advocates to help you engage your users? Well, CSC feels we had the winning combination to go wide, go global and go viral. Our case study talk during the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston last week described what CSC did to fill the seats at our baseball stadium of collaboration.

Adoption Planning: Plan for the People

So how did we do it? And — how is any of that different from any other large IT project? Well, most of us know how to roll out tools, get the system set up, configured and deployed. And we felt that we had done everything we could to prepare for a successful IT deployment. But we realized early on this could not be just another an IT project.

This was a tool for people. We knew we would ask users to evolve how they think about the nature of their work and the transparency with which they do that work.

You hear in the industry you can’t plan to go viral. I argue you can’t viral if you don’t plan well – – Claire Flanagan

So to view the highlights of our story, view our presentation now on SlideShare:

Below is a very brief summary of our adoption planning tactics:

  1. Adoption Principles – Before we started we thought carefully about our adoption guiding principles, those areas that would shape how we would approach deployment. There are no right answers, no silver bullet, in fact the answers to any of these areas can vary for your organization and your culture. We addressed areas like executive involvement, listening and adapting to our politics and culture, thinking about taxonomy patterns and emergence, staffing for success (community managers and advocates) and other important areas.
  2. Advocate Planning – We knew we needed to both quickly scale the efforts of our small project team, but also knew that we needed to reach out to our global users to help us go wide, global and viral. We located a team of 12 chief champions who helped us bring on another 100 advocates prior to our launch.
  3. Executives as Advocates – We knew our executives were not only sponsors of our program, but they were also critical in “walking the talk” and showing that C3 was safe for business. Our advocates helped us engage executives as well as they worked with local management.
  4. Seed Use Cases – No one likes joining a space that is empty. They don’t know what to do or where to start. Also, these tools have to be more than just “Facebook for the Enterprise”. Your executives demand it. We felt it was important to seed use cases that met our business goals, use cases that our global project, competency or community teams could start using right away. Our advocates helped us seed over 200 groups prior to our C3 pilot launch.
  5. Watercooler – Don’t overlook the importance of relationships and the value of a ‘virtual’ watercooler – a location where pure “social” conversations are ok. We knew we needed to trust our employees, but we needed to also create ‘bump in’ opportunities where new relationships and trust could form.
  6. Feedback & Transparency – We knew it was important to provide formal feedback mechanisms while practicing transparency. With the help of our advocates we engaged in both the easy and the tough conversations online – and we feel – earned the trust of our employees along the way.

The above are obviously only small summary points of our talk.

To hear the more specific tactics we used in our Adoption Planning, catch one of our upcoming talks at one of the many industry conferences coming up. Watch our blogs for where you’ll hear our case study next.

Advertisements

About Claire Flanagan
Claire Flanagan is a Director of KM and Enterprise Social Business & Community strategy at CSC. Views expressed are her own.

4 Responses to Enterprise 2.0: It’s No Field of Dreams (A CSC Case Study)

  1. Pingback: Reflections on the Enterprise 2.0 Conference Boston 2010 « Dachis Group Collaboratory

  2. Pingback: Reflections on the Enterprise 2.0 Conference Boston 2010

  3. I’m Social Media Project Manager in Ubisoft.

    I really appreciate your blog and especially when you explain the importance of working on culture aspects to ensure that the “C3” would be adopted by teams. I think that it’s a key success factor for these enterprise 2.0 projects.

    First of all, congrats for the successful platform you have created at CSC and all the rewards you won for this project.

    I’d like to discuss for a few minutes together about the best practices of these kind of projects (change management, communication plan, rewarding) and to exchange about the way we imagine the enterprise 2.0 culture in our respective companies.

    Many thanks.

  4. Pingback: Adoption – Getting Social Tools Adopted In the Workplace | Blake Thornton

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: